US

MOOCs from the world’s best universities: MIT and Harvard gamble on open-source, free edX for everyone, everywhere – insights from swissnex Boston

The last two years have witnessed the latest development in higher education: the onset of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Claimed to be the downfall of the traditional form of higher education and to pose an imminent threat to the contemporary university model, MOOCs have gained a lot of attention from educational institutions, but have yet to prove to be a viable alternative for meeting the needs of the education sector. In the meantime, universities worldwide are carefully observing and assessing this latest trend of offering courses online to students. Even top tier, traditional Ivy League schools like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University have succumbed to the MOOCs fever and have cooperatively founded their own MOOC platform called edX. Written by Felix Moesner, swissnex Boston

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MOOCs and the United States Government

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have received considerable attention from the US government, although very little of this sunshine has translated into any policy decisions. Beginning with the Obama White House, the potential of MOOCs has been recognized. Since 2009, education has been the hot button topic in policy circles but with an innovative twist: the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) has digested the issue mentioning MOOCs as a promising form of education in a memo to the President in December 2013. Knowing that President Obama since 2012 has spoken extensively on the affordability of education, PCAST wrote that technology in delivery of education could change the economic tide if new innovations could replace the brick and mortar setting of learning – and MOOCs play a prominent role in his persuasive argument: as universities and for-profit companies have embraced the technology and made it work, the government could support this migration by doing the following: Allow free market forces to decide which innovations are best, encourage accrediting bodies to be flexible to educational innovation, and to share results of the new platforms to measure effectiveness. Written by Tracy Dove, Elena Lorenzo, Andy Ledergerber

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MOOCs – The End to Traditional Universities? (part 2) – insights from swissnex San Francisco

Take a cumulated student loan debt in America of about $1 trillion (surpassing credit card debt), new developments in artificial intelligence, more affordable tools for video capturing, editing and sharing, widespread availability of broadband Internet, innovative interactions enabled by social media, and visionary professors turned entrepreneurs. The result is MOOCs – Massively Open Online Courses – and possibly a major threat to traditional universities. Written by Christian Simm, swissnex San Francisco

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MOOCs – The End to Traditional Universities? (part 1) – insights from swissnex San Francisco

Take a cumulated student loan dept in America of about $1 trillion (surpassing credit card debt), new developments in artificial intelligence, more affordable tools for video capturing, editing and sharing, widespread availability of broadband Internet, innovative interactions enabled by social media, and visionary professors turned entrepreneurs. The result is MOOCs – Massively Open Online Courses – and possibly a major threat to traditional universities. Written by Christian Simm, swissnex San Francisco

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Results of a study conducted by Pennsylvania University

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Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States

Babson Survey Research Group performed a study on online learning in U.S,  based on responses from more than 2,800 colleges and universities. Since ten years Babson is monitoring online learning. Academics were asked some questions and interesting data came out of the report, that we would like to share with you. (more…)